5 weeks of deadlock in the United States after the 2000 presidential election 1

5 weeks of deadlock in the United States after the 2000 presidential election 1

If Trump asks the Supreme Court to resolve the vote counting dispute with Biden, it will be the second time in US history that the US court decides the presidency.

On US Presidential Election Day November 7, 2000, polls showed that Republican candidate George W. Bush, governor of Texas, was ahead of Democratic candidate, Vice President Al Gore, by a margin.

George W. Bush (left) and Al Gore in the 2000 debate. Photo: NBC.

When the votes were counted that evening, the two were in tight competition, as several states reported very close results.

Initially, many media outlets `named` Gore as the winner in Florida, but then they retracted, assessing the race in this state as still too fierce.

A few hours later, they determined Bush had won in Florida, meaning he had won the presidency.

The results of the vote count in Florida are unclear.

On November 9, 2000, Gore called for a hand recount in four counties with strong Democratic traditions, including Palm Beach.

The legal battle between the two sides took place rapidly.

Counting machines rejected thousands of ballots due to mechanical errors or because they were not completely perforated, with small pieces of paper still stuck to the ballots.

Meanwhile, Bush advisers accused Democrats of trying to throw out 25,000 mail ballots from two Republican-favored counties.

On November 26, 2000, the state of Florida determined Bush to be the winner with a difference of 537 votes.

On December 12, 2000, the US Supreme Court intervened for the first time in a presidential election, five weeks after it took place.

The court’s decision closed the door to victory for Gore.

On December 18, 2000, Bush was elected the 43rd president of the United States by the electoral college with 271 electoral votes, although Gore won more popular votes.

5 weeks of deadlock in the United States after the 2000 presidential election

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